Posts tagged ‘(Sandy Lam) Lam Yik Lin’

Sandy Lam 林憶蓮 (Lam Yik Lin) To Perform 2 Days February 16-17, 2013

Blogged By: De De Tillman

Source: The Colosseum at Caesars Palace

Posted: Thursday January 24, 2013 @8:43 p.m PST

 

 

One of China’s biggest pop stars of the late 20th century, Sandy Lam rose to fame in the 1980s as a Cantopop singer before expanding her fan base significantly in the 1990s with stylistically diverse albums in Mandarin, Japanese, and English. Born in Hong Kong on April 26, 1966, she made her recording debut in 1984 in association with CBS Sony.

Most notable among her many albums are her late-’80s City Rhythm trilogy and her artistically daring 1991 album Wildflower, often hailed retrospectively as her masterpiece. Around the turn of the century, she abandoned Cantopop and focused her efforts instead on the international marketplace, recording albums in Mandarin, Japanese, and English.

Among these international efforts, the Mandarin-language album Love, Sandy (1995) was perhaps her biggest success. In 2005 she released her first Cantonese album in almost a decade, S/L. ~ Jason Birchmeier, Rovi

MORE  INFORMATION:

The Colosseum At Caesars Palace Tickets

3570 Las Vegas Strip  Las Vegas, 89109
(702) 866-1400

Sandy Lam Singapore Concert Creepy Or A Crowd Pleaser? (Video)

Blogged & Additional By: La Tray

Source & Story Credit: Channel News Asia – Wikipedia

Media Credit: Photo (generasia) / Video (fizzna5)

Posted: Saturday April 7, 2012 @1:32 p.m. PST

 

 

Will the real Sandy Lam please stand up, please stand up?

 
For the first 25 minutes of her “Sandy Lam MMXII Concert – Singapore” stint on Friday night, the 46-year-old Mandopop star seemed way out of character.

 
At one point, the Hong Kong-born singer even came across as creepy.
For a start, Lam opened her one-night only show at the Singapore Indoor Stadium, by literally shedding her winsome, goody-two-shoes image: The veteran singer peeled out of a cocoon, after it slowly descended on stage.

 
Once Lam materialised to the 7,500-strong roaring crowd, she slipped straight into enigmatic mode, belting out her latest Cantonese single “Impermanence”, complete with tribal-like dance moves.

 
And it didn’t help that her back-up dancers were dressed up to look like mummies.
Where’s the affable Sandy Lam, one wonders.

 
Then, the morbid element of her opening act dispersed the moment Lam morphed into a rock chick to deliver a medley of lively Cantonese numbers, including “Egyptian Rose” and “Grey”.

 
Though Lam pulled off those genres, it seemed as if the audience members weren’t used to her experimental delivery, judging from their silence.

 
It was only 25 minutes later when Lam – the real Sandy Lam – paused to address the crowd that the Indoor Stadium came to life.

 
“This is like my second home, because I’ve been here for a while before – so you’re like my family. And it’s wonderful to have such a big family,” Lam said in a mix of English and Mandarin, to the newly-roused crowd.

 
Oh, yes. There she is. Welcome back, Sandy Lam.

 
As if riding on her fans’ zest, Lam delivered what seemed to be the night’s first crowd pleaser, her 1991 Mandarin ballad “Not at Home”, which propelled her to regional fame.

 
Although the up-tempo version didn’t quite hit home, the crowd’s receptive response hinted it was hungry for more familiar favourites.
And she did not disappoint.

 
Lam brought the house down minutes later, when she sang “Suffering in the Cold Wind”, another mid-90s hit from her album “Love, Sandy”.

 
Needless to say, Lam’s delivery of the ballad – mastered by Taiwan music maestro Jonathan Lee, whom Lam married in 1998 and divorced in 2004 – captivated the audience.

 
But while it was definitely all hits where Lam’s vocals were concerned, there were a few misses in her concert.

 
One of them was the choice of songs, which included numbers like “Midnight Mercy”, “After End” and “Burn”, which the Singaporean crowd was generally unfamiliar with.

 
And then there was the disappointing absence of the uniquely-Singapore arrangement of the classic “Lover’s Tears”, a remix she famously sang with local composer Dick Lee.

 
Finally, it was Lam’s random line up that worked against her.
Indeed, it makes sense to intersperse different genres throughout the concert to maintain rhythmic balance and the element of surprise.

 
But when one-quarter of the audience is misled by Lam’s “encore finale” and starts heading for the exit, there needs to be a re-think of such a concept.

 
The saving grace, fortunately, was Lam herself.
The moment Lam reappeared after her faux encore finale, audience members hurriedly flocked back into the hall.

 
By that time, none of the audience members – who were apparently thrilled by Lam’s reappearance – bothered to sit and enjoy her final number of the night.
They chose instead to give Lam the standing ovation she deserved, as she serenaded the crowd with “Sadness”.

 

ADDITIONAL: According to Wikipedia Lam’s age is 45, she was born April 26, 1966.

Sandy Lam

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